Crumpets (Vegan)

Vegan Crumpets

I’m here with my second post in a week, and I feel like I’m ready to get back into a proper groove. After only baking a couple of times in January, in the last week alone I’ve baked 3-4 times. So lets get straight back into it. This week I’ve finally made something that’s been on my list for ages; crumpets. I got the poaching rings several months ago and just didn’t get round to it. I love crumpets though, I love the way you can coat them with huge amounts of butter and it both soaks into the holes and pools on the top. The way it dribbles down your arm while you’re eating it. I love covering them with marmite, for a strong tang, or some sweet jam or marmalade.

Vegan Crumpets

The process isn’t particularly quick, so if you’re after a quick morning breakfast this probably isn’t the recipe for you. The batter/dough needs about an hour to rise and then each individual crumpet will take 12+ minutes to bake. You can see them slowly solidifying, and watching the tiny bubbles rising and bursting is incredibly soothing. The whole thing requires some serious patience though; if you flip them too soon you’ll lose out on the holes, sealing it all over.

Vegan CrumpetsThis recipe was originally found on the excellent Bootstrap Cook’s website, and you should go and support them, as they’re having a tough time at the moment, but put a whole lot  of good work into food equality and other important issues.  I’ve also realised that my last three recipes were vegan, this hasn’t really been intentional but it’s unsurprising seeing as my girlfriend has just finished a vegan month.

Vegan Crumpets

Crumpets (Vegan Option)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 300g plain flour
  • 2 tbsp dried active yeast
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 300ml milk (we used soya)
  • 200ml warm water
  • A generous pinch of salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Mix together the flour, yeast and bicarb, then the wet ingredients in a separate jug.
  2. Pour in, mixing well, and stirring in the salt and pepper. You'll form a loose batter.
  3. Cover with a tea towel and leave in a warm place for an hour to rise.
  4. Heat a large, flat frying pan over a low heat (if using gas, or medium-low if using electric). Add a poaching ring or two and a small drizzle of oil into the bottom of the ring(s). Make sure it's on a very low heat.
  5. Add three good sized tablespoons of batter into each and now, wait. Cook for 12 minutes, watching the bubbles come to the top and slowly popping.
  6. Once you're happy that the dough has cooked and the bubbles have popped, remove the ring and flip over. Fry for a further minute at a slightly higher heat to brown off the top.
  7. Serve as you wish, but I will forever recommend butter and marmite.